Friday, 26 April 2019

My First European Geosciences Union General Assembly // by Olivier Humphrey


Olivier is a PhD student at the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (British Geological Society / University of Nottingham) researching iodine dynamics. 


The Vienna International Centre
April 7 – 12 marked a very successful EGU General Assembly at the Vienna International Centre in Vienna, Austria. I was one of 29 members of BGS staff in attendance, alongside many other scientists from 113 countries.
As this was my first EGU assembly, and first large scale conference I wasn’t too sure of what to expect. The annual conference is the largest geoscience conference in Europe, with something for everyone;  from atmospheric sciences to tectonics and structural geology.  With 5531 oral, 9432 poster, and 1287 PICO presentations given in just 5 days the timetable and most importantly map of the venue, provided via the EGU app, were an absolute necessity!  
During the conference I presented a poster entitled ‘Iodine Dynamics in Soil Solution’. This work was a combination of experiments I’ve conducted whilst studying for my PhD at the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry (British Geological Survey – University of Nottingham). The aim of this work was to further understand the rapid soil-plant-iodine interactions which immediately follow an iodine addition event (e.g. rainfall, irrigation, and fertilisation). Understanding iodine dynamics in soil solution and availability for plant uptake could be used to plan future phytofortification strategies.
Olivier presenting his poster 'Iodine Dynamics in Soil Solution'
Through the poster I presented data on the first application of microdialysis, an extraction technique predominantly used in neuroscience, to sample isotopically labelled iodine (129I) from soil solution every 2.5 hours for a total of 40 hours to assess short-term sorption and fixation processes. The results showed that iodine undergoes a number of reactions; (i) iodine is instantaneously adsorbed – the proportion of which is significantly influenced by specific soil properties, (ii) inorganic iodine is partially converted to soluble organic compounds and (iii) the remaining iodine in soil solution is rapidly removed, incorporated into the solid soil phase. We found that the newly formed soluble organically-bound iodine had relatively low molecular weights (<5 kDa). Interestingly, we also observed a slower time-dependent formation of larger iodinated compounds (12-18 kDa) in some soils. Loss rates were modelled using simultaneous ordinary differential equations and demonstrated that iodine present in soil solution, not instantaneously absorbed, had an average half-life of <2 hours. The results from this research have the potential to influence future strategies for iodine phytofortification as iodine applied to soils is rapidly lost, therefore, alternative fortification process, which are not reliant on the soil-to-crop transfer would be favourable.
Overall, the conference was a great success. As well as being able to share my research with the scientific community, some of whom are also trying to apply microdialysis to soil science,  I was able attend a lot of fantastic talks, engage in a few stimulating PICO and engage with some great poster sessions. . I’ll be aiming to attend next year; see you there?  


The PhD was supervised under the umbrella of the Centre for Environmental Geochemistry: Dr Scott Young, Dr Liz Bailey and Professor Neil Crout (University of Nottingham) and Dr Louise Ander and Dr Michael Watts (BGS).

EGU is Europe’s general assembly for geoscientists, held in Vienna, Austria each year. The 2020 assembly will be held May 3 – 8. More details here.

Friday, 12 April 2019

Coconuts and curry – a geochemical survey programme in Sri Lanka...by Charles Gowing

Steep sided valleys of tea and rubber plantations above
fertile paddy fields
Charles Gowing and Paul Everett have returned from a BGS Global funded trip to the Geological Survey and Mines Bureau (GSMB) in Sri Lanka where they have been working with geologists and chemists on refinement of a national geochemical survey programme. Soil sampling is well underway in the south and north of the country and the GSMB have already produced the first environmental series atlas of top soil in the Rakwana-Tangalla region.


The aim of the visit was to review existing soil sampling procedures and discuss options for sampling stream sediments with field geologists, and to discuss analytical geochemical procedures and sampling handling processes with laboratory chemists, and to learn how their geochemical maps were compiled.

In the laboratories, aqua regia is used to digest top soil samples before analysis using a combination of ICP-OES and AAS for a specified suite of elements. Existing methods were demonstrated with a view to recommending extensions to the range of elements measured and improvements to the quality system. Proposed methods of analysing sub soil and stream sediment samples were explored in detail, together with potential enhancements to sample receipt, preparation and storage processes.

The highlight of the trip was a field visit 2 hours drive south of Colombo to Matugama to see soil sampling in action. A trek past paddy fields in the valley bottoms took us past houses where we were offered rambutan (large lychee) and mangosteen by householders and then up through tea plantations interspersed with pepper and cinnamon, as well as spotting vines lashed to trees to allow easy access to the fruit from which local beverage is fermented.

From L-R: Charles and the laboratory chemists at GSMB debating calibration protocols; Paul walking to field location through tea, pepper and cinnamon plantations.  
Field sampling can be a laborious process especially obtaining samples from as deep as 2 m, so ingenuity is required to assist manual sampling by auger. Sites are selected to be close to the specified sampling coordinate and away from recent fertilizer applications or other sources of potential anthropogenic contamination. Subsoil samples are cone-quartered in the field to reduce the amount of material transported out of the field.
 
In an area washed by monsoon rains, streams can be seasonal, but we located an accessible sandy bank for Paul to be able to demonstrate panning to the GSMB geologists; local schoolchildren were fascinated by such activity from their grandstand view on a nearby bridge.

From L-R: Gravity assisted manual soil sampling; Paul and GSMB geologists panning for heavy minerals.
Working at 35˚C and 100% humidity presented additional challenges, particularly as the field sites were located on steep hillsides above the paddy fields in the valley bottoms. The hot work was rewarded with refreshing drink from king coconuts, although half of the fluid seemed to end up down our shirts, and a delicious curry lunch served on banana leaves in a nearby Buddhist temple, after which we were invited to become monks – a truly tempting offer given their hospitality and the beautiful locations.
       
Charles enjoying the local hospitality.
Dr Charles Gowing is the UKAS Quality Manager for the Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratories in The Centre for Environmental Geochemistry and has analysed samples water, soil and stream sediment samples for the G-Base programme since 1992. Paul Everett is a building stones specialist and has coordinated and managed several BGS geochemical baseline sampling campaigns since 2009.

Wednesday, 10 April 2019

Geodata Management in Sierra Leone...by Tim McCormick

The Regent landslide, photographed about 2 months after it happened.
BGS works closely with the UK Government Department for International Development (DFID) on a programme called Partnerships for Development (previously known as Great for Partnerships) which supports BGS staff building partnerships with geological organisations in several of DFID’s target countries.  The current focus is on Sierra Leone, Kenya, Tajikistan, and the Kyrgyz Republic.  In Sierra Leone, BGS works with the National Minerals Agency and the Petroleum Directorate of the Government of Sierra Leone to help them strengthen their capacity in natural resources management and governance.

 “My brother and his entire family were killed. All gone.”  The taxi driver was emotional as he told us about the terrible toll taken by the 15 August 2017 landslide in Regent which swept away hundreds of homes built on the slopes of Sugarloaf Mountain, killing more than 1,100 people.  The landslides, mudflows and floods that plague the Sierra Leonean capital Freetown and its outlying districts like Regent during the rainy season are yet another trial for the inhabitants of this beautiful but impoverished country with its troubled history.  In the 16th – 18th centuries this was the coast from where enslaved Africans were transported to the New World.  More recent history has seen the Civil War of 1991 – 2002, and the Ebola virus epidemic of 2014 – 2016.

Our work with the Directorate of Geological Survey (DGS), a department of the National Minerals Agency, and the Petroleum Directorate (PD) includes a number of activities designed to help them enhance their geoscience skills and facilities.  We are providing training in geological subjects including sedimentology, structural geology, petrography, field mapping, geochemical sampling, and geohazards, and in data management subjects including geographic information systems (GIS) and databases.  We are also working with the DGS and PD to develop information systems to help them to better store, maintain and share data.


Working with the Technical Services Laboratory staff at the DGS in
New England, Freetown.
One reason why this is important is because greater understanding of the geology of a country, coupled with the ability to organise and share this information with partners, can lead to discovery of previously unknown natural resources for industry or construction.  This in turn can bring in much needed foreign investment from, for example, mining companies, governments, and supra-national organisations like the World Bank and the European Union.

Better understanding of a country’s natural resources also means that the government can monitor and police the exploitation of those resources, ensuring that mining companies comply with local laws, pay licence fees and taxes, work responsibly with respect to local populations and the environment, and provide local employment.  It was illicit and uncontrolled mining and trading of natural resources, gold and so-called ‘conflict diamonds’, which fuelled the civil wars in both Sierra Leone and neighbouring Liberia.

While our work in Sierra Leone is mainly focussed on natural resources, there are other advantages to be gained from geological knowledge and good geodata.  It can contribute to public health improvements through, for example, provision of clean water, development of better building codes, or understanding the presence and mobility of natural and man-made toxins in the environment.  It might lead to ways to mitigate disasters like the Regent landslide.  Other BGS colleagues are working with the engineering sector to accomplish this.

We are coordinating our work with a World Bank-funded project called EITAP2 (Extractive Industries Technical Assistance Project Phase 2) which is carrying out an airborne geophysical survey of Sierra Leone early in 2019 (in fact, it’s happening as I write).  This will produce a country-wide aeromagnetic data set that will hopefully highlight areas of interest for natural resources.  These will be followed up with targeted ground-based geological mapping and geochemical sampling.

From L-R: Crowds enjoying the Eid al-Fitr holiday on Lumley Beach, Freetown; A view across Freetown.
The DGS wants to be sure it is in a position to handle the data that will be generated by the World Bank project, and exploit it to its greatest potential.  My part in our work is to run training courses and help develop the information systems to do this.  We are utilising ‘open source’ software technologies because the DGS and PD, in common with many government institutions across Africa, cannot rely on continued access to the funds to pay annual licence fees for commercial software.

Initially, we have focussed on working with the DGS Technical Services Laboratory to develop a simple computer-based laboratory information management system (LIMS) that stores and organises the documentation associated with each job that the lab handles.  This sort of system is important because it allows the lab to record its activities in detail, and it means that customers, who include mining companies and NGOs, can have confidence in how the lab operates and produces its deliverables.

The next phase is to develop a geochemical/geological samples database ready to store data about the samples that will be collected by the World Bank’s project, and track the analyses carried out on them.

I have been lucky to work in Freetown with several of my BGS colleagues who bring geological, IT, data management, or laboratory expertise to the project: Darren Jones, Jane Robertson, Roman Roth, Anubha Singh, Steve Thorpe and John Wheeler, as well as the staff of the DGS and the PD.  Darren and Kathryn Goodenough manage the project, and a number of other colleagues from across BGS are involved in providing geoscience training activities, both in the classroom and the field.

Tim McCormick is a Geoscience Data Specialist at the BGS. For more information then click here.

Friday, 5 April 2019

The BGS are going to #EGU19!

The annual EGU General Assembly is the largest and most prominent European geosciences event. It attracts over 14,000 scientists from all over the world, with sessions covering a wide range of geoscience topics.

This year, the EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, from 7 - 12 April 2019. Naturally, the British Geological Survey are going to be well represented!

Below is your guide to #EGU19, detailing all BGS staff events throughout the week, with times, dates and Twitter handles.

Remember to follow the hashtag #EGU19 for all the latest on social media, and tag @BritGeoSurvey if you're there so we can retweet you!

BGS colleagues presenting @ EGU19

Raushan Arnhardt

Poster: Development of a GIS Based Tool to Assess Engineering Geological and Geotechnical Ground Conditions in Greater Manchester, UK
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 12:00
Hall: X4


Matt Ascott

Presentation: Public Water Supply is Responsible for Significant Fluxes of Inorganic Nitrogen in the Environment
Date: Monday 8 April
Time (CEST): 09:15 - 09:30
Room: 2.25

Presentation: Phosphorus Fluxes to the Environment from Mains Water Leakage: Seasonality and Future Scenarios 
Date: Monday 8 April
Time (CEST): 16:45 - 17:00
Room: 2.95

Presentation: Relative Influence of Changes in Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth and Climate Change on Estimations of Borehole Yields 
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 16:30 - 16:45
Room: 2.25


John Bloomfield

Presentation: Understanding the Potential Groundwater Teleconnections to Forecast Hydrological Extremes
Date: Monday 8 April
Time (CEST): 12:15 - 12:30
Room: B

Poster: The Impacts of Major Groundwater Droughts Based on the European Drought Impact Inventory (EDII)
Date: Monday 8 April
Time (CEST): 16:15 - 18:00
Hall: A

Presentation: Relative Influence of Changes in Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth and Climate Change on Estimations of Borehole Yields 
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 16:30 - 16:45
Room: 2.15

Presentation: European Groundwater Drought Initiative (convener)  
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 08:30 - 10:15
Room: 2.61

PICO: CAMELS-GB: A Large Sample, Open Source, Hyrdo-Meteorological Dataset for Great Britain 
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 11:19 - 11:21
Room: PICO Spot 5b


Mihai Cimpoiasu

Poster: Combining X-Ray and Electrical Resistivity Tomography Methods Towards a New Methodology of Soil Hydraulics Properties Assessment
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 16:15 - 18:00
Hall: X1


Carol Cotterill

Presentation: Seismic Geomorphological Mapping of Buried Glacial Landforms at Dogger Bank, North Sea: Implications for Ice-Sheet Retreat
Date: Monday 8 April 
Time (CEST): 17:00 - 17:15
Room: 0.31

Poster: The Last British-Irish Ice Sheet in the Southern North Sea: Ice Limits, Timing and the Influence of Dogger Bank
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 12:30
Hall: X4

Presentation: ECORD Mission Specific Platform Expeditions in the International Ocean Discovery Programme: Flexible Operations and Technological Developments 
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 12:00 - 12:15
Room: 0.31

Poster: Outreach in Science: What Does it Mean to You? (convener) 
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 14:00 - 15:45
Hall: X4


Melanie Duncan

Presentation: International Natural Hazard Forward Look: Weekly Threat Analysis for the UK Government
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 14:15 - 15:00
Room: L6

Presentation: Citizen Science Using Mobile Phone Technology in St Vincent & The Grenadines to Facilitate Near-Real Time Multi-Hazard Observations
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 12:15 - 12:30
Room: N1


Fabio Dioguardi

Poster: A Sedimentological Model for Quantifying the Sendimentation Rate from Particle Laden Turbulent Boundary Layer Shear Flows 
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 16:15 - 18:00
Hall: X2

Poster: The Physical Properties and Rheological Characteristics of Flowing Volcanic Ash: First Insights from Laboratory Rheometric Analyses
Date: Monday 8 April
Time (CEST): 16:15 - 18:00
Hall: X2


Sam Engwell (@samengwell)

Presentation: The Devastating Eruption Tsunami of Anak Krakatau - 22 Dec 2018
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 10:00 - 10:15
Room: L8

Poster: The Physical Properties and Rheological Characteristics of Flowing Volcanic Ash: First Insights from Laboratory Rheometric Analyses
Date: Monday 8 April
Time (CEST): 16:15 - 18:00
Hall: X2


Poster: Insight into the Dynamics of the 1883 Karaktau Eruption and Associated Tsunamis Through Deposit Characterisation and Interpretation
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 16:15 - 18:00
Hall: X2


Davide Gamboa (@GambixPT)

Poster: Revisiting the Giant Ruatoria Debris Flow on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand: Results from IODP Expeditions 372 and 375, Site U1520
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 16:15 - 18:00
Hall: X1 


Helen Glaves (@HelenG66)

Presentation: (Sub-programme Groups Meeting ESSI: BY INVITATION ONLY)  (convener)
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 14:00 - 15:45
Room: 3.16

Presentation: Mentoring Programme Planning Meeting (convener) 
Date: Monday 8 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 12:30
Room: 2.31

Presentation: Division Meeting for Earth and Space Science Informatics (ESSI) (convener) 
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 12:45 - 13:45
Room: 0.96

Presentation: Ian McHarg Medal Lecture by Stefano Nativi (convener)
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 19:00 - 20:00
Room: L3

Presentation: Establishing a Comprehensive Open and FAIR Ecosystem for Solid Earth and Environmental Researchers, Repositories, Publishers, Policy Makers and Funders (co-convener) 
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 12:30 / 14:00 - 15:45
Room: 0.96

Presentation: How to Convene and Chair a Session at the General Assembly (co-convener)
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 08:30 - 10:15
Room: 2.85

Presentation: ENVRI-FAIR - the Next Step Towards FAIRer Environmental Research
Date: Thursday 9 April
Time (CEST): 09:00 - 09:15
Room: 0.94

Presentation: Building Australia's 'Downward Looking Telescope' - an Opportunity to Develop International Collaboration through Scientific Integration of Observational and Data Infrastructures
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 11:00 - 11:15
Room: 0.94

Poster: Establishing a Comprehensive Open and FAIR Ecosystem for Solid Earth and Environmental Researchers, Repositories, Publishers, Policy Makers and Funders (co-convener) 
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 08:30 - 10:15
Hall: X1


Jessica Holmes

Presentation: The Use of Near-Surface Geophysics for Monitoring a Slow-Moving Landslide Affecting Transport in Infrastructure
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 08:30 - 08:45
Room: 1.61


Olivier Humphrey (@OlivierHumphrey)

Poster: Investigating Soluble Iodine Dynamics in Soil using Microdialysis and SEC-UV-ICP-MS
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 08:30 - 10:15
Hall: X1 


Colm Jordan (@ColmJordan)

Presentation: METEOR: Modelling Exposure Through Earth Observation Routines to Aid Sustainable Development 
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 11:00
Room: 0.96

PICO: A morphometric Approach to Reveal the Effects of Ground-ice Thaw on Rapid Mass Movements in Northern Iceland
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 10:49 - 10:51
Room: PICO Spot 4

PICO: Investigating Potential Landslide Combing Time-series InSAR with Detailed Geomorphological Mapping
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 10:55 - 10:57
Room: PICO Spot 1 

Presentation: Citizen Science Using Mobile Phone Technology in St Vincent & The Grenadines to Facilitate Near-Real Time Multi-Hazard Observations
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 12:15 - 12:30
Room: N1


Jack Lacey (@JackHLacey)

Presentation: Middle to Late Holocene Palaeoenvironmental Change and Anthropogenic Impact in Tropical South East Asia: a Multi-Proxy Lacustrine Record from Tasik Chini, Malaysia 
Date: Monday 8 April
Time (CEST): 09:45 - 10:00
Room: D3

Presentation: DeepCHALLA – a 250,000 Year Record of Hydroclimate from Equatorial East Africa using Diatom and Organic Isotope Data 
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 08:45 - 09:00
Room: 0.31


Mel Leng (@MelJLeng)

Presentation: DeepCHALLA – a 250,000 Year Record of Hydroclimate from Equatorial East Africa using Diatom and Organic Isotope Data
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 08:45 - 09:00
Room: 0.31

Presentation: Middle to Late Holocene Palaeoenvironmental Change and Anthropogenic Impact in Tropical South East Asia: a Multi-Proxy Lacustrine Record from Tasik Chini, Malaysia 
Date: Monday 8 April
Time (CEST): 09:45 - 10:00
Room: D3

Poster: The Sercon CryoGas: for Automated, High Precision δ2H and δ13C Analysis of Gaseous and Dissolved Methane 
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 12:30
Hall: A

Poster: A Holocene Mulit-Proxy Speleothem Palaeoclimate Record from Iraqi - Kurdistan
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 14:00 - 15:45
Hall: X5


Graham Leslie

Poster: The Influence of Granite Bodies on Extensional Basins: Insights from Structural, Geodynamic and Thermal Modelling
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 08:30 - 10:15
Hall: X2

Presentation: Accretion of peri-Gondwanan Elements in the UK Gondwanan Sector or Iapetus
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 16:30 - 16:45
Room: K1

Poster: Structural Geology in the 21st Century: The Role of a Modern Geological Survey 
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 12:00
Hall: X4


Ashley Patton

Poster: Observed Controls on the Seasonal Variability of Urban Groundwater Thermal Regimes
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 16:15 - 18:00
Hall: A


Helen Reeves (@BGS_Helen)

Presentation: Landslide Multi-Hazard Risk Assessment, Preparedness and Early Warning in South Asia: Integrating Meteorology, Landscape and Society (LANDSLIP)
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 14:00 - 14:15
Room: M2

PICO: Landslide Domains in Data-Poor Regions: Case Study on East Sikkim, India 
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 14:06 - 14:08
Room: PICO Spot 4


Johanna Scheidegger (@jo_scheidegger)

Poster: Towards Modelling the Effects of Groundwater-fed Irrigation on the Ganges Basin: Incorporating 2D Lateral Groundwater Flow and Groundwater and Surface Water-fed Irrigation in the VIC Mascroscale Hydrological Model
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 12:30
Hall: A

Poster: Investigating the Influence of Human Water Use Practices on the Hydrological Cycle Using a Sociohydrological Modelling Framework with a Case Study in North India
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 12:30
Hall: A


Andrew Smith

Poster: The Sercon CryoGas: for Automated, High Precision δ2H and δ13C Analysis of Gaseous and Dissolved Methane 
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 10:45 - 12:30
Hall: A


Dave Tappin

Presentation: ***The Devastating Eruption Tsunami of Anak Krakatau - 22 Dec 2018***
Date: Wednesday 10 April
Time (CEST): 10:00 - 10:15
Room: L8

Poster: Modelling the Runout of Subaerial to Subaqueous Rock Avalanches in Milford Sound / Piopiotahi, New Zealand
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 14:00 - 15:45
Hall: X3

Poster: How to Make Mud Interesting: Engaging a Range of Audiences with Marine Sediment Laboratory Based Research
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 14:00 - 15:45
Hall: X3


Simon Tapster 

Presentation: Chronology and Rates of Magmatic, Volcanic and Ore-Forming Processes (co-convener) 
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 08:30 - 10:15
Room: 2.91

Presentation: New Perspectives into the Timing and Nature of Fluid Exsolution and Migration in Cu Porphyry-forming Magmatic Systems - Evidence from the Yerington
Date: Thursday 11 April
Time (CEST): 09:15 - 9:30
Room: 2.91

Poster: Chronology and Rates of Magmatic, Volcanic and Ore-Forming Processes (co-convener) 
Date: Friday 12 April
Time (CEST): 14:00 - 15:45
Hall: X2


Joanna Thompson

Poster: Using Core and Outcrop Analogues to Predict Flow Pathways in Core: Examples from the Permo-Trias of North-Cheshire, UK
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 16:15 - 18:00
Hall: X1


Chris Williams

Poster: Creation, Curation and Delivery of High Resoluation Spatial Datasets Ensuring Reliability for Product Development
Date: Tuesday 9 April
Time (CEST): 08:30 - 10:15
Hall: X2



BGS Colleagues attending but not presenting:

Bentje Brauns
Dan Condon (@DanJCondon)
Dan Parkes
Jen Jamieson-Ball (@JamiesonBall)
Matt Harrison (@BGSMatt)